16th Aug 2014

Sevens?

The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss

Elodin to Kvothe

“Do you know the seven words that will make a woman love you?”

“It is a word. Words are pale shadows of forgotten names. As names have power, words have power. Words can light fires in the minds of men. Words can wring tears from the hardest hearts.There are seven words that will make a person love you. There are ten words that will break a strong man’s will. But a word is nothing but a painting of a fire. A name is the fire itself.”

Kvothe to Denna

"One of the masters at the University once told me that there were seven words that would make a woman love you.” I made a deliberately casual shrug. “I was just wondering what they were.”

Denna to Kvothe

“Looks like I’m destined to be loveless.”
“There you go with seven words again,” she said with a smile. “You do realize you always do that?”

“That’s the first thing you said to me. I was just wondering why you’re here.  My seven words. I’ve been wondering the same thing for so long.”

Eragon by Christopher Paolini

Brom to Eragon

"'It is the way of things ... I must. Will you take my blessing?' 
Eragon bowed his head and nodded, overcome. Brom placed a trembling hand on his brow.
'Then I give it to you May the coning years bring you great happiness.' He motioned for Eragon to bend closer. Very quietly, he whispered seven words from the ancient language, then even more softly told him what they meant.
'That is all I can give you... Use them only in great need.'"

Harry Potter by J.K. Rowling

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Seven Books

Seven Years at Hogwarts

A seven Part Soul (Horcruxes)

Seven players on a quidditch team

Seven is the age most magical abilities reveal themselves

Vault 713 (Sorcerer’s Stone)

Seven galleons for Harry’s wand

Gryffindor common room is on the 7th floor

Seven bottles in Snape’s logic problem

Seven Weasley children

Harry was born on the 7th month

Harry marries the 7th child in the Weasley family

There is a chapter called The Seven Potters

Wizards come of age at 17

Seven obstacles to the sorcerer’s stone

Seven individuals attacked by the basilisk

The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien

"Seven for the Dwarf-lords in their halls of stone”

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Numerology

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I would really like to look more into this.  I’ve dreamed for a while about finding a cohesive way to write a paper on numbers in fantasy literature.  Obviously it would require a lot more research into Numerology and numerical symbolism, but maybe the thread of sevens that runs through all of these works is the beginning of that.

Any other sevens that I’m missing?

15th Aug 2014
stairwaytoheavenandhell:

MINDBLOWN one more time

Lets clarify:
7 horcruxes
the diary
the ring
the locket
the cup
the diadem
Nagini
Harry
and the (very unstable) fragment of soul living in Voldemort, which makes an 8 part soul
And I thought it was an infinity..like because of imortality..
But to be fair, this isn’t Rowling’s original design of The Dark Mark.  The artwork she actually approved for her novels in the US has illustrations of the Dark Mark that look like this:

The artwork for the US books is done by Marie GrandPré.  This is the artwork for chapter 27 “The Lightning-Struck Tower’” in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince.
As you can see, this design doesn’t include an 8 or an ∞, so it’s not completely fair to say that Rowling hid subliminal symbolism in the Dark Mark.  There also may be different illustrations in international books with different artists.  Plus, I’m not sure to what degree she collaborated with the WB on this rendering of the Dark Mark, so I don’t think this post is completely accurate.

stairwaytoheavenandhell:

MINDBLOWN one more time

Lets clarify:

7 horcruxes

  1. the diary
  2. the ring
  3. the locket
  4. the cup
  5. the diadem
  6. Nagini
  7. Harry

and the (very unstable) fragment of soul living in Voldemort, which makes an 8 part soul

And I thought it was an infinity..like because of imortality..

But to be fair, this isn’t Rowling’s original design of The Dark Mark.  The artwork she actually approved for her novels in the US has illustrations of the Dark Mark that look like this:

The artwork for the US books is done by Marie GrandPré.  This is the artwork for chapter 27 “The Lightning-Struck Tower’” in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince.

As you can see, this design doesn’t include an 8 or an ∞, so it’s not completely fair to say that Rowling hid subliminal symbolism in the Dark Mark.  There also may be different illustrations in international books with different artists.  Plus, I’m not sure to what degree she collaborated with the WB on this rendering of the Dark Mark, so I don’t think this post is completely accurate.

14th Aug 2014
"One morning in mid-December Hogwarts woke to find itself covered in several feet of snow. The lake froze solid and the Weasley twins were punished for bewitching several snowballs so that they followed Quirrell around, bouncing off the back of his turban."
Source:

Philosopher’s Stone, Chapter 12


Hey, remember that time Fred and George Weasley bewitched a bunch of snowballs to punch Voldemort repeatedly in the face?

(via sassysnitch)

😂😂😂 And even even after selling “You No Poo” Voldemort never actually directly went after the Weasley twins.  Badasses.

13th Aug 2014

literature meme || {2/2} genres
→ Fantasy

Fantasy is a genre of fiction that commonly uses magic and other supernatural phenomena as a primary plot element, theme, or setting. Many works within the genre take place in imaginary worlds where magic and magical creatures are common. Fantasy is generally distinguished from the genres of science fiction and horror by the expectation that it steers clear of scientific and macabre themes, respectively, though there is a great deal of overlap between the three, all of which are subgenres of speculative fiction.

In popular culture, the fantasy genre is predominantly of the medievalist form, especially since the worldwide success of The Lord of the Rings and related books by J. R. R. Tolkien. In its broadest sense, however, fantasy comprises works by many writers, artists, filmmakers, and musicians, from ancient myths and legends to many recent works embraced by a wide audience today. 

Fantasy takes a lot of elements from mythology which arises in the beginning of most cultures as a way to explain natural phenomena and the human spiritual connection with the world.  As fantasy itself as a genre comes from such vast beginnings, one might be able to say that fantasy is a descendant of the human dreams and aspirations of creation itself.

12th Aug 2014

ihave-lived-a-thousand-lives said: I really, really want some red-haired children to be born in Ademre in The Doors of Stone.. what do you think? ;)

kingkillerarchives:

Oooohohohoho! Interesting…

Really interesting idea.  This brings up the entire idea of conception in the Kingkiller Chronicle. I feel like all of us readers are sitting there looking down on the Adem because of their rejection of our idea of “man mothers,” but how much do we really know about biology in the world of the Four Corners? Could it be that we are making preconceived conjectures about the biological facilities of the characters in the novel because we identify with them and believe that they must then be biologically similar to ourselves?

Is the culture that is familiar to us really barbarous like the Adem believe? Are they the true representation of civilization? Kvothe finds that there are nuggets of truth in the Ademic culture, so couldn’t this be correct too?  We reject it automatically because it isn’t true for us, but what if Rothfuss is calling us to recognize and examine our own arrogance as readers, and to disassociate us with familiar concepts?

I’ve also wondered if perhaps the Adem idea that a woman “ripens” and produces children at a certain time of the year could be due to some environmental and biological underlying factors.  Perhaps regularly the Adem women do not produce children because their Ketan keeps their body fat percentage low enough that they do not menstruate.  If this is true, perhaps also in Ademre the weather becomes so fierce during a part of the year that they are not able to practice their Ketan outside (remember that for the most part Ketan is practiced outside, and the Adem houses are very small), and from lack of exercise the women’s body chemistry changes, menstruation resumes, and these factors permit them to have children—or cause them to “ripen.”

Of course, redheaded children in Ademre would directly contradict this theory of mine, so I’m excited to see either way what happens!

12th Aug 2014
picsandquotes:

Genie, you’re free.

I saw this and it was just too much. I know I already posted one about Robin Williams, and again, it’s not strictly Fantasy Literature, but in some ways it is.  Technically Aladdin is an adaptation of a tale taken from Tales From 1001 Arabian, which involves a great deal of fantasy (though it’s usually classified as medieval literature).  The thing that touched me with this image (aside from the caption that killed me) was that I felt like I could really see Robin Williams’ face through Genie. 

picsandquotes:

Genie, you’re free.

I saw this and it was just too much. I know I already posted one about Robin Williams, and again, it’s not strictly Fantasy Literature, but in some ways it is.  Technically Aladdin is an adaptation of a tale taken from Tales From 1001 Arabian, which involves a great deal of fantasy (though it’s usually classified as medieval literature).  The thing that touched me with this image (aside from the caption that killed me) was that I felt like I could really see Robin Williams’ face through Genie. 

12th Aug 2014

Today the world lost a legend.  I think that I can effectively say that with his death, a hole was torn in everyone’s childhood, but it goes without saying that his memory will endure, living within the works he put his heart and soul into.  Although the legacy of Robin Williams does not live specifically within the realm of Fantasy Literature, he contributed in many ways to the genre of fantasy itself, and I know that I personally will remember his contributions for years to come.  It saddens me that today the world felt absence of his exceptionally bright spark of invigorating madness, but there is comfort in knowing that its light will live on in the joy that it gave all of us.  

In the words of Peter Banning of Hook (1991), “to die would be a grand adventure,” and I hope it is.

Robin Williams July 21, 1951 – August 11, 2014

11th Aug 2014
okprongs:

MORE HARRY POTTER BOOKS

Where is feline Voldemort?
Although it would have to be a pretty dumb cat to not leave when Voldemort started blasting the place apart and killing people.. so a really old, fat, and slow Voldemort cat?

okprongs:

MORE HARRY POTTER BOOKS

Where is feline Voldemort?

Although it would have to be a pretty dumb cat to not leave when Voldemort started blasting the place apart and killing people.. so a really old, fat, and slow Voldemort cat?

11th Aug 2014

Anonymous said: From what I can understand the 3D cameras have a habit of washing out colours so the set designers, make-up artists and costume designers were told to exaggerate the colouring. When you see the sets in the behind the scenes videos they're all overly bright, especially the mirkwood set. I think they were afraid that the colour in legolas' contacts wouldn't show up so they made them brighter. However I think they went a bit to far.

Really great insight here! I didn’t even consider the 3D cameras, even after watching all of the making of The Hobbit video blogs (available on YouTube).

This episode of the video blog in particular details some of the necessary accommodations and adjustments for shooting in 3D. At 6:20 they mention the coloring in Mirkwood, and at 6:47 Tami Lane, the Prosthetics Supervisor discusses the adjustments in makeup coloring of the characters in relation to the 3D cameras.

All of these video blogs are fabulous and really show the incredible amount of work that goes into such an ambitious (and wonderful) film.

10th Aug 2014

Legolas Greenleaf and his eyes through the ages (or the films).  

Two photos each from “The Fellowship of the Ring” (2001) and “The Two Towers” (2002), and three photos each for “The Return of the King” (2003) and “The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug” (2013)

This proves that Orlando bloom does not age (or at least hardly does), but I also compiled these screenshots to illustrate the slight difference in Legolas’ eye color in The Hobbit films.  I know with humans at least, eye color can naturally darken over time, but I don’t think that was what the films were getting at.  It seems like they got new contacts for Orlando Bloom in The Hobbit films that are lighter than those he wore in The Lord of the Rings films.  It is a very small detail transferred over 10 years, but because it is a detail of such an iconic character, I feel that I must give a very small disapproving tut-tut or a wag of the finger to Peter Jackson.  

This detail is certainly minutia, but when dealing with such a strong fan-base and cult-following, minutia rarely goes unnoticed.

9th Aug 2014

The Kingkiller Chronicle—Kvothe’s Eyes

We’ve heard a lot about Kvothe’s eyes and how they change color based on his emotions; it’s a notable feature within the novels.  We also know that Bast’s eyes behave similarly.  

At first I was wondering if it was something that happened during Kvothe’s time in the Fae, which would explain why his eyes and Bast’s both change colors, but then I realized that it happens long before he enters the Fae.  

What could the reason for his changing eyes be?

Does he have a bit of Fae in him?

Does this have something to do with his relation to the Lackless family?

if so, does that mean that something to do with the Fae is hidden within the Lackless box?

8th Aug 2014

Harry Potter—The Lost Prophecy

I recently took a Linguistics course where we played with certain passages and analyzed them under several different linguistic mediums.  The last part of the project that was to display linguistic registers.  There were a lot of options such as phonetically writing the passage in a different accent (British, Southern US, Boston, New York, etc.), but because it was an open-ended assignment, I chose to try my hand at doing something unique and interesting. Cue Dr. Seuss

So here we have the lost prophecy from Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix:

"The one with the power to vanquish the Dark Lord approaches… born to those who have thrice defied him, born as the seventh month dies… and the Dark Lord will mark him as his equal, but he will have power the Dark Lord knows not… and either must die at the hand of the other for neither can live white the other survives… the one with the power to vanquish the Dark Lord will be born as the seventh month dies…"

And here is my own version of the prophecy rewritten in an attempted imitation of Dr. Seuss' style:

A someone is headed right here to this spot, coming nearer and nearer at a jog or a trot…

Someone with the power to trounce and defeat the darkest of dark lords where he sits on his seat…

Born in the summer, in sunny July, born to parents who daring defy…

They braved him not once, nor did they twice, they did it a total of times that were thrice…  

And the dark lord will mark him his equal or double, incurring a turbulent tricksy true trouble…

Yet power within him, greatly it grows, power the Dark Lord nothingly knows…

One will go out if the other remains, one lousy lacks luck while the other one reigns…

7th Aug 2014

These are artistic renderings of Hades, Zeus, and Poseidon, but when I saw them, I automatically thought of Melkor, Manwe, and Ulmo.  I had already imagined Tolkien’s valar on the same plane as gods and goddesses, but I suppose that logically follows.  I mean, to be fair nearly every creation myth and creation story has gods and goddesses that represent different aspects of the natural world.  But the idea that Tolkien’s valar are roughly based in or structures around the gods and goddesses of Greek mythology is a very intriguing idea that I would like to investigate further later.

6th Aug 2014
melkorwashere:

Sketch of Valar during Valian Years (before the Lamps)
Namo,Yavanna,Aule,Melkor,Manwe,Varda,Ulmo and Orome
No Irmo and Nienna because they look a lot like Namo, and no Nessa because she looks a lot like Orome. No other girls,because I don’t care for them actually. And no Tulkas - because I can’t imagine his appearance before the Years of the Lamps. 
It was a bad idea to draw Aule and Melkor together,because generally they made from one material,both of them are giant rocks. So Melkor is a rock + ice + fire, and Aule is rock + lead,gold,manganese and other kinds of ore. 

I love the idea that the valar have different forms that reflect their own dominions.  Sometimes it can be a little hard to keep things straight with all the names in Tolkien’s universe, but the visuals definitely help.

melkorwashere:

Sketch of Valar during Valian Years (before the Lamps)

Namo,Yavanna,Aule,Melkor,Manwe,Varda,Ulmo and Orome

No Irmo and Nienna because they look a lot like Namo, and no Nessa because she looks a lot like Orome. No other girls,because I don’t care for them actually. And no Tulkas - because I can’t imagine his appearance before the Years of the Lamps. 

It was a bad idea to draw Aule and Melkor together,because generally they made from one material,both of them are giant rocks. So Melkor is a rock + ice + fire, and Aule is rock + lead,gold,manganese and other kinds of ore. 

I love the idea that the valar have different forms that reflect their own dominions.  Sometimes it can be a little hard to keep things straight with all the names in Tolkien’s universe, but the visuals definitely help.

6th Aug 2014

New Poster!


Do I need words to explain how much I love these, or do the posters already sort of do it on their own?

New Poster!

Do I need words to explain how much I love these, or do the posters already sort of do it on their own?

(Source: deanogorman-daily)