21st Jul 2014
This is a funny take at what I was getting at in this post
Heroes have friends, villains have followers.
and the heroic ideals always state that Friends>Followers



Dumbledore raised his eyebrows. “And what will become of those whom you command? What will happen to those who call themselves — or so rumor has it — the Death Eaters?” 
Harry could tell that Voldemort had not expected Dumbledore to know this name; he saw Voldemort’s eyes flash red again and the slitlike nostrils flare. 
“My friends,” he said, after a moment’s pause, “will carry on without me, I am sure.” 
“I am glad to hear that you consider them friends,” said Dumbledore. “I was under the impression that they are more in the order of servants.” 
—Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince by J.K. Rowling

This is a funny take at what I was getting at in this post

Heroes have friends, villains have followers.

and the heroic ideals always state that Friends>Followers

Dumbledore raised his eyebrows. “And what will become of those whom you command? What will happen to those who call themselves — or so rumor has it — the Death Eaters?”

Harry could tell that Voldemort had not expected Dumbledore to know this name; he saw Voldemort’s eyes flash red again and the slitlike nostrils flare.

“My friends,” he said, after a moment’s pause, “will carry on without me, I am sure.”

“I am glad to hear that you consider them friends,” said Dumbledore. “I was under the impression that they are more in the order of servants.” 

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince by J.K. Rowling

21st Jul 2014

Where are the Amyr?

The Cthaeh says to Kvothe:

"Not many folk will take your search for the Amyr seriously, you realize," the Cthaeh continued calmly. "The Maer, however, is quite the extraordinary man. He’s already come close to them, though he doesn’t realize it. Stick by the Maer and he will lead you to their door.

Then Jokes:

 ”Blood, bracken, and bone, I wish you creatures had the wit to appreciate me. Whatever else you might forget, remember what I just said. Eventually you’ll get the joke. I guarantee. You’ll laugh when the time comes.”

I don’t think this is actually correct, but it’s an idea.  What if the Valaritas door in the archives is the door, or one of the doors of the Amyr? It could be like the door to the fae where it’s one of many gateways that lead to an entirely different realm, or it could be a door to one of many strongholds, meeting places, or other types of places significant to the Amyr.  

Valaritas has no direct translation in Latin, but it makes me think of Veritas, which is truth.  It’s possible that this door could contain truths (especially about the Amyr or the Chandrian), or books that contain the truths of the world.  I think that this would be a little obvious for Patrick Rothfuss since he’s clearly a bit of a creative genius.

If Latin is the root of the word (which I doubt it actually is), here are some other slanted possibilities:

In Latin:

  • Valeritas means roomy
  • Vale means farewell

While in Spanish:

  • Valer is the verb to have value or to be worth, which also to some degree means to cost, though not in monetary terms

In English:

  • Valor means “great courage in the face of danger, especially in battle” (The New Oxford American Dictionary)

I’m not entirely sure what the implications of these are, but thefarewell translation is a rather foreboding prospect.

I have also read some theories that advocate that Master Lorren is one of the Amyr, especially given that there is a stringent an austere lack of information on the Amyr in the archives.  I am skeptical about this, but perhaps not all of the affiliates of the Amyr are hands of the law—perhaps they too have archivists and other less righteously aggressive positions.  I feel that somehow this would account for Lorren’s emotional distance, imperturbable calm, and seeming lack of humanity. But if this theory is correct and the Master Archivist is one of the Amyr, it would make sense for the door in the archives to have something to do with the Amyr.

The problem is with the other Masters.  They would have to know the true nature of the door, or be at peace with a lie about it.  I doubt nosy and overbearing Master Hemme would be okay with Lorren telling him that he need not know what lies behind the door.  Unless the Masters are all affiliated with the Amyr, and I find that extremely hard to believe.  Plus, we are lead to believe that Puppet knows about the door since he tells Kvothe “I don’t think the four-plate door should be of any concern to a student.”

I know these are all extremely farfetched theories, so feed me your ideas!

20th Jul 2014
frillyfacefins:

Dol Guldur, by Angus McBride

There aren’t too many images of the Battle of Dol Guldur, but I’m certainly hoping that we get to see it in “The Hobbit: The Battle of Five Armies,” or BOFA.   
Many websites have come out with different release dates for the new trailer, the latest of which was predicted to come out today.  As of the present moment, that clearly isn’t the case, but I know that I, and fans like myself, will be waiting with baited breath to get the first second glimpse of the film.  
Technically this photo, as I understand, was the first:

frillyfacefins:

Dol Guldur, by Angus McBride

There aren’t too many images of the Battle of Dol Guldur, but I’m certainly hoping that we get to see it in “The Hobbit: The Battle of Five Armies,” or BOFA.   

Many websites have come out with different release dates for the new trailer, the latest of which was predicted to come out today.  As of the present moment, that clearly isn’t the case, but I know that I, and fans like myself, will be waiting with baited breath to get the first second glimpse of the film.  

Technically this photo, as I understand, was the first:

20th Jul 2014

Why isn’t veritaserum the answer for everything?

Because it’s too easy.  Plus, then it leads to a totalitarian society, and all of the sudden Harry Potter meets 1984 and there’s a horrifying clash of Magic is Might meets Big Brother. It should logically be a controlled substance (possibly by the Department of Mysteries, like the time turners) that has regulations on its brewing and ingredients, etc., because the use of it essentially eliminates free will.

But still, it seems like if it is legal to use veritaserum on Barty Crouch Jr. (unless Dumbledore is giving a big middle finger to the law again), then it certainly should have been used when the Death Eaters were on trial, and in other serious trials.

20th Jul 2014

Maybe this was just a story for people who are, perhaps, not entirely normal.

At first I wasn’t sure what this was about, and I saved it as a draft because I thought it was just another book written by Patrick Rothfuss that was obscure and that hadn’t made it into the limelight.
I thought to myself “well, I’ll look it up later and see where I can find it.”  When I looked up on Amazon, however, I was very surprised to find this summary:

Deep below the University, there is a dark place. Few people know of it: a broken web of ancient passageways and abandoned rooms. A young woman lives there, tucked among the sprawling tunnels of the Underthing, snug in the heart of this forgotten place.
Her name is Auri, and she is full of mysteries.
The Slow Regard of Silent Things is a brief, bittersweet glimpse of Auri’s life, a small adventure all her own. At once joyous and haunting, this story offers a chance to see the world through Auri’s eyes. And it gives the reader a chance to learn things that only Auri knows….
In this book, Patrick Rothfuss brings us into the world of one of The Kingkiller Chronicle’s most enigmatic characters. Full of secrets and mysteries, The Slow Regard of Silent Things is the story of a broken girl trying to live in a broken world.

Auri is one of my favorite characters, and I am so excited for this novella.  It’s slated for release on October 28, 2014

Maybe this was just a story for people who are, perhaps, not entirely normal.

At first I wasn’t sure what this was about, and I saved it as a draft because I thought it was just another book written by Patrick Rothfuss that was obscure and that hadn’t made it into the limelight.

I thought to myself “well, I’ll look it up later and see where I can find it.”  When I looked up on Amazon, however, I was very surprised to find this summary:

Deep below the University, there is a dark place. Few people know of it: a broken web of ancient passageways and abandoned rooms. A young woman lives there, tucked among the sprawling tunnels of the Underthing, snug in the heart of this forgotten place.

Her name is Auri, and she is full of mysteries.

The Slow Regard of Silent Things is a brief, bittersweet glimpse of Auri’s life, a small adventure all her own. At once joyous and haunting, this story offers a chance to see the world through Auri’s eyes. And it gives the reader a chance to learn things that only Auri knows….

In this book, Patrick Rothfuss brings us into the world of one of The Kingkiller Chronicle’s most enigmatic characters. Full of secrets and mysteries, The Slow Regard of Silent Things is the story of a broken girl trying to live in a broken world.

Auri is one of my favorite characters, and I am so excited for this novella.  It’s slated for release on October 28, 2014

12th Jul 2014
Just a little meticulous point for all of you fantasy literature purists out there, this is the actual quote from The Fellowship of the Ring, available for preview on Google Books. I painted this quote on my dresser a couple of years ago, and people were so confused, often thinking I’d messed up.  I had to continually remind them, I’m an English Major, and I double and triple check my work when committing it to paint.  
If, however, you were looking for the quote in the film, it does say “All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given to us.” I’m sure the screenwriter wanted to weed out the confusion that exists surrounding the line in the book.  

Just a little meticulous point for all of you fantasy literature purists out there, this is the actual quote from The Fellowship of the Ring, available for preview on Google Books. I painted this quote on my dresser a couple of years ago, and people were so confused, often thinking I’d messed up.  I had to continually remind them, I’m an English Major, and I double and triple check my work when committing it to paint.  

If, however, you were looking for the quote in the film, it does say “All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given to us.” I’m sure the screenwriter wanted to weed out the confusion that exists surrounding the line in the book.  

11th Jul 2014

Valaritas?

The initial description:

"It was quite by accident that I found the four-plate door.
It was made of a solid piece of grey stone the same color as the surrounding walls. Its frame was eight inches wide, also grey, and also one single seamless piece of stone. The door and frame fit together so tightly that a pin couldn’t slide into the crack.
It had no hinges. No handle. No window or sliding panel. Its only features were four hard copper plates. They were set flush with the face of the door, which was flush with the front of the frame, which was flush with the wall surrounding it. You could run your hand from one side of the door to the next and hardly feel the lines of it at all.
In spite of these notable lacks, the expanse of grey stone was undoubtedly a door. It simply was. Each copper plate had a hole in its center, and though they were not shaped in the conventional way, they were undoubtedly keyholes. The door sat still as a mountain, quiet and indifferent as the sea on a windless day. This was not a door for opening. It was a door for staying closed.

In its center, between the untarnished copper plates, a word was chiseled deep into the stone: VALARITAS.”

And when Kvothe speaks with Master Elodin about it:

“’What about the stone door in the Archives?’ I asked. ‘The four-plate door. Now that I’m a Re’lar can you tell me what’s behind it?’
Elodin laughed. ‘Oh no. No no. You don’t aim for small secrets do you?’ He clapped me on the back as if I’d just made an especially good joke. ‘Valaritas. God. I can still remember what it was like, standing down there looking at the door, wondering.’
He laughed again. ‘Merciful Tehlu, it almost killed me.’ He shook his head. ‘No. You don’t get to go behind the four-plate door.’”

The third book is called The Doors of Stone.  That’s right—Doors—not just Door.  This obviously means that there is more than one door of stone.  It is still open for interpretation whether or not the Valaritas door in the archives really is one of the doors of stone to which the title refers.  After all, I’m sure that in the world of the Four Corners there are many doors fashioned out of stone.

This makes me wonder, though, if the door in the archives is one of the doors, what or where is the other door? Is it a door that lies just beyond the four-plate door, and is a second entry point or a second level? Or is it a door on the opposite side of wherever the four-plate door leads? Like the pair of vanishing cabinets in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, what if the pair of doors of stone is a type of portal that leads somewhere? And if that’s true, where do the doors of stone lead to?

As an afterthought, the initial description of the four-plate door also reminds me of Kvothe’s seamless and mysterious thrice-locked chest, which also has at least one copper lock.

6th Jul 2014

Where is Hogwarts located?

I know this subject has been disputed for a while, especially because Hogwarts is unplottable.

When I was thumbing through my copy of Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, however, I came across the “Acromantula” entry.  The book is printed with supposed annotations by Harry, Ron, and Hermione, as shown in the first photos.  

These annotations prove one unassailable fact:

Hogwarts is in Scotland

27th Jun 2014
melkorwashere:

sketch of Sauron-Annatar  >:3
For me Sauron’s ”Annatar” form is not some form of ”real Sauron being pretty”, but a form of absolutely another creature. So in my version Sauron chose an appearance of noldo - elvish nobility. For better chances 

Sauron the deceiver as Annatar.  It makes me wonder if the elves realized the fault in their vanity after they were deceived to their detriment and to the detriment of all of Middle Earth.

melkorwashere:

sketch of Sauron-Annatar  >:3

For me Sauron’s ”Annatar” form is not some form of ”real Sauron being pretty”, but a form of absolutely another creature. So in my version Sauron chose an appearance of noldo - elvish nobility. For better chances 

Sauron the deceiver as Annatar.  It makes me wonder if the elves realized the fault in their vanity after they were deceived to their detriment and to the detriment of all of Middle Earth.

23rd Jun 2014

10 Things Kvothe Absolutely Needs to Do in Day 3 of Patrick Rothfuss' Kingkiller Chronicles Books

If you’re a fan of Patrick Rothfuss’ wonderful The Name of the Wind and The Wise Man’s Fear, the first two books of The Kingkiller Chronicles, you know two things: 1) it’s a wonderfully grounded tale set in an elaborate world of high fantasy, and 2) it seems like it’s going to be completely impossible for Rothfuss to finish Kvothe’s story in just one more book.

1) He’s got to kill a king.

The books are called The Kingkiller Chronicles after all, and now that Kvothe has told two-thirds of this story — although he’s only up to his late teens — he hasn’t met a single king yet, let alone killed one. The popular rumor on the internet is that Kvothe’s archnemesis at the University, the noble brat Ambrose, will end up being king, although as it stands Ambrose is so far the way down the line of succession Kvothe can fight him pretty significantly and not get himself beheaded (not that Ambrose wouldn’t like to).

2) He has to figure out the mystery of the Amyr and the Chandrian.

In a story about a story about stories, there are tons of tales that remain half-told, but the one that has to reach some sort of conclusion is what is going on with the Chandrian, the mysterious, seemingly cursed, possibly immortal group of seven who serve as the Chronicles’ main antagonists — as well as the Amyr, the order of church knights that had fought them until they also seem to have inexplicably disappeared. While most people regard the Chandrian as legends, Kvothe has first-hand knowledge of them — so it stands to reason the Amyr exist, too. But what happened, and where did they go?

10 Things Kvothe Absolutely Needs to Do in Day 3 of Patrick Rothfuss' Kingkiller Chronicles BooksEXPAND

3) He has to confront Cinder.

Kvothe’s search for the truth behind the Chandrian isn’t just out of curiosity. He and his parents were Edema Ruh, a gypsy-esque, wandering people who often travel from town to town as wandering minstrels and entertainers. Kvothe’s father began composing a song about the fall of the ancient hero Lanre, who lost his love, went mad and became the first of the seven Chandrian. But since the Chandrian are determined to erase (violently, if need be) almost all mention of themselves, Kvothe’s entire troupe was murdered by them, and his parents killed specifically by than Chandrian named Cinder. Kvothe has been hunting him down ever since - only to randomly defeat a group of bandits who he later learned was led by Cinder. But for what possible purpose?

4) He has to talk to Gods (probably).

In Kvothe’s famous quote to the Chronicler at the beginning of his story, he says:

"I have stolen princesses back from sleeping barrow kings. I burned down the town of Trebon. I have spent the night with Felurian and left with both my sanity and my life. I was expelled from the University at a younger age than most people are allowed in. I tread paths by moonlight that others fear to speak of during day. I have talked to Gods, loved women, and written songs to make the minstrels weep. You may have heard of me."

So far he’s burned down the town of Trebon (more or less; he actually stuffed a dragon full of heroin accidentally, and the dragon burned down the town), he’s been expelled from the University (the bastion of education and magic on Kvothe’s world, although the expulsion was almost instantly repealed) and slept with the faerie queen Felurian (not a metaphor, he went to the Faerie realm and did a lot of sex). But talking to Gods? We’re not sure that’s happened yet. Unless Kvothe is referring to the time he talked to Ctaegh, the hateful faerie tree that destroys the lives of everyone it speaks to (you really need to read these books).

5) He has to confront Denna’s patron.

The beautiful Denna isn’t quite the love of Kvothe’s life — they haven’t slept together or anything, but they’re entwined in pretty much every other way. Denna seems to have some connection to the Chandrian through her mysterious patron she refers to as “Master Ash,” who Kvothe has sworn not to track down, even though the Ctaegh cruelly told him that Ash beats Denna. More confusingly, Master Ash had Denna compose a song about the fall of Lanre — again, the first Chandrian, who also destroyed seven entire cities — where Lanre is solely portrayed as a hero. What gives? (Note: If you’ve realized the possible connection between the Chandrian named Cinder and “Master Ash,” go ahead and clap yourself on the back, but I promise there’s no way Rothfuss is being that on-the-nose).

6) He has to figure out what the deal with the Doors are.

Kvothe has encountered some very mysterious doors in his journey — the door covered with four plates of copper in the University library, the “lockless” door at the Lackless estate, the doors of stone that the man who stole the moon was put behind (thus tearing the normal and Faerie worlds apart — seriously, read these books) and more. We have no idea what their deal is. However, since the third book in The Kingkiller Chronicles is titled The Doors of Stone, I think it’s safe to assume we’ll be getting some sort of answer.

7) He has to steal a princess from a “sleeping barrow-king.”

If there’s one part of Kvothe’s quote that we can be sure he hasn’t done, it’s “steal a princess from a sleeping barrow-king.” We have met no kings, no princesses, and even less barrows. Now, there is a girl named Auri - seemingly a former University student who got in a magical accident, went a bit mad, who now lives on the roofs of the University buildings and in the labyrinths below — but whether she’ll be the princess in question is anybody’s guess.

10 Things Kvothe Absolutely Needs to Do in Day 3 of Patrick Rothfuss' Kingkiller Chronicles BooksEXPAND

8) He has to transform into a humble, hidden Innkeeper.

When the Chronicler first comes to the Waystone Inn, he meets Kvothe is in disguise as Kote, an exceedingly average innkeeper. Given the importance of words in this series, the change is more than in just his name — Kote seems to have lost his ability to do magic, fight, and a great deal more from his younger days.as Kvothe. There’s a lot of things that need to happen to get from Kvothe at the end of The Wise Man’s Fear to the subdued Kote of the present, almost all of it bad — with the possible exception of Bast, Kvothe’s student and apprentice. But Bast is also a Faerie, and how he came to meet Kvothe is unknown… as are his current intentions, as he clearly has his own agenda in getting Kvothe to tell his tale and remember who he is.

9) He has to screw up the entire world.

The world of The Kingkiller Chronicles is in bad shape when The Name of the Wind begins- - there are wars, conscripts, not enough food, general hardship, and, oh, giant, razor-sharp spider-monsters wandering towards civilization from the Stormwal mountains. As Kvothe/Kote flatly states in NotW, “All of this is my fault. The scrael, the war. All my fault.” What the hell did Kvothe do?

10) He has to try to fix the present.

It wouldn’t be much of a tale if The Doors of Stone ended with Kvothe finishing his story then going back to work behind the bar of the inn while war and giant razor spiders tear the country apart. Chances are he’s at least going to try to put things right, although whether perhaps Kvothe’s future adventures might be better suited to another book set in the same world (just not part of The Kingkiller Chrionicles). Which would be fine, because these 10 things aren’t evenclose to settling all the questions and mysteries presented in Rothfuss’ fantastic series. I doubt we’ll ever get all the answers, but it would be a shame for Kvothe’s story to truly stop at The Doors of Stone.

I’m also wondering if The Doors of Stone and therefore the entire Kingkiller Chronicle will end right at the present (with the telltale lines about a silence of 3 parts).  It seems like there’s too much for Kvothe to do in the present, so I’m wondering if…or maybe just hoping that possibly an entirely new series is going to start with Kvothe’s adventures in the present?

21st Jun 2014
"He grasped a great two-handled cup, as heavy as he could carry, and cast one fearful eye upwards. Smaug stirred a wing, opened a claw, the rumble of his snoring changed its note.
Then Bilbo fled."
Source:

The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien

This is a passed down piece of lore from Beowulf when a thief who steals a cup sets a dragon on Beowulf’s kingdom.  It is fitting that Thorin dies in the Battle of Five Armies since Beowulf also dies in the aftermath of the theft of the cup, though Thorin’s demise is in a much more roundabout way.

There is also a parallel here to the cup of Helga Hufflepuff, which is very similar in description to the cup in The Hobbit.  Hepzibah Smith, he owner of the cup in Tom Riddle’s time, also has an excess of treasures and wealth (like a dragon) that she has little need for.

21st Jun 2014

incaseyouart:

The full set of my versions of the Harry Potter DVD covers :D 

All done with black ball-point pen. The DVD cover for Half-blood Prince was a holographic picture, with Snape and Draco in one mirror, Harry and Dumbledore in the other… so I combined them :D

What I wouldn’t give for a comic book just like this.  Even an animated series where they get everything right (unlike the movies)

21st Jun 2014
Barad dûr, the dark tower, in comparaison to earthly landmarks (and some Star Wars).
I hope Sauron built in an elevator..

Barad dûr, the dark tower, in comparaison to earthly landmarks (and some Star Wars).

I hope Sauron built in an elevator..

20th Jun 2014

Dol Guldur

askmiddlearth:

image

Dol Guldur was (like so many of Sauron’s fortresses) originally a much nicer place. It was once called Amon Lanc (“Bald Hill” in Sindarin), and was the capital of the Elvenking Oropher’s realm in Greenwood the Great (now called Mirkwood.)

Sometime around the year 1000 of the Third Age a…

I was researching this because I was wondering why in the films Dol Guldur, which is an abandoned fortress, is set up with the aesthetic of an evil torture chamber with all the gibbets and spikes and such.  I’m guessing that was just an executive decision on Peter Jackson’s part—Don’t get me wrong, PJ, it looks good, all spooky and what not.  Since it was an elven stronghold before, I can’t imagine those features being of the elves own personal design. 

Lord of the Rings experts out there, am I on the right track?

20th Jun 2014
The Walker is Abroad by irish-chan
There isn’t that much fan art out there about The Dark is Rising, which is probably because the sequence is an older set of novels, but irish-chan’s work is great.
I think about this moment in The Dark is Rising sequence (by Susan Cooper) a lot.  Will Staton wakes on his 11th birthday and finds that time has effectively stopped.  The was Cooper captures the childlike wonder and the stillness of the world in between time, blanketed by snow is so perfect.  It reminds me a lot of waking up as a child in the early morning to find that it had snowed, when the sky was still a hazy purple and it felt like I was the only person in the world.  The quality and feel of the silence when it has snowed…there’s just something that’s nearly inexplicable, but Cooper does a great job committing it to paper.  

The Walker is Abroad by irish-chan

There isn’t that much fan art out there about The Dark is Rising, which is probably because the sequence is an older set of novels, but irish-chan’s work is great.

I think about this moment in The Dark is Rising sequence (by Susan Cooper) a lot.  Will Staton wakes on his 11th birthday and finds that time has effectively stopped.  The was Cooper captures the childlike wonder and the stillness of the world in between time, blanketed by snow is so perfect.  It reminds me a lot of waking up as a child in the early morning to find that it had snowed, when the sky was still a hazy purple and it felt like I was the only person in the world.  The quality and feel of the silence when it has snowed…there’s just something that’s nearly inexplicable, but Cooper does a great job committing it to paper.